We raise pork on pasture where our animals can root, waller, forage, feed, and roam freely. 


Our pigs live on pasture and are supplemented with custom mixed feed and vegetable scraps. We purchase our pigs at weaning age from a few neighboring farms. We then place them out on open pasture with 24 hour access to water, feed, and shelter and let them grow. All animals are checked daily, but the pigs require more frequent checks during the hot summer months. We raise Hampshire Cross, Duroc, Red Wattle, and Tamworth breeds due to their darker color skin, which takes care of a lot of the concern of sunburn with pasture based pigs. 


For each hog, we keep a detailed health record showing routine maintenance and any other pertinent health information. Customers are welcome to read through the health record for any hog purchased for consumption.


Cooking Tips

General Cooking Information

  • Allow frozen products to thaw in the refrigerator.

  • Be careful not overcook.  It cooks faster than conventionally raised pork.

  • Cooking low and slow is the name of the game: You can sear the outsides of the meat for cuts, like pork chops, on very high heat for a couple minutes per side then reduce the temperature to very low if continuing to cook on the stovetop or grill or transfer to the oven.

  • Let it rest: Remove the meat from the cooking medium when it is 5°F below the ideal finished temperature as it will continue cooking when removed from the heat. Let it sit for 8 – 10 minutes before serving. This will let the juices redistribute throughout the meat and you’ll get a much better end result.

Pastured Pork

  • The USDA cooking guidelines for pork cuts like steaks, chops, and roasts is to cook to an internal temperature of 145°F, so make sure to avoid cooking your pork to a leathery consistency.

  • Cook most ground cuts like sausages to 160°F

  • When cutting meat – cooked or raw – cut against the grain. This will prevent the muscle from shrinking and getting tough.


Whole Hog Costs

The Beef and Pork Whole Animal Buying Guide (pdf) published by Iowa State University Extension Service is a great resource for determining what cuts are available and how much meat you will receive.

Blank cut sheet from This Old Farm. Use this to get an ideas of what cuts are available.